The Slippy Flippy Penguin Challenge: A Tutorial on Sprite Kit

I stuck my foot in my mouth.

I’m now chewing vigorously and that is why you are reading this.
Photo Mar 19, 9 52 47 AMFor those who never heard of Flappy Bird, it was the game sensation nobody expected. It was a game that was very simple: a little bird moves up if you tap the screen, and falls due to gravity if you don’t. The game play is also simple: fly between two pipes without touching them and get a point. If you touch the pies or the ground, the game ends. While that seems easy, game play is very difficult.
The programming world was outraged when this jumped into #1 slot in iTunes and the developer began making $50,000 a day, far more than much slicker games with intensely realistic graphics. Then suddenly, the author pulled it from the stores. There was controversy. Not only was it simple, the graphics used  went out of style before the Gameboy. How did such a cheap game added to the store almost a year ago suddenly have such a meteoric rise? Apple’s App Store and Google Play hunkered down for an invasion of clones to the now defunct Flappy Bird, (which since I first wrote this is being resurrected ) and the author now says he pulled it because it was so addictive.
I was explaining the Flappy Bird controversy to a Friend. I claimed I could, actually anyone could, write Flappy Bird in a week. My friend dared me to try, and so I had ended up with a week-long challenge — write a Flappy Bird clone in a week then get it into the App store, with a variation or two.
Thus Slippy Flippy Penguin was born. If it gets into the App Store is another thing.
I didn’t want to write a clone – I prefer originality, like the game I’ve been working months to finish and is still under development. Besides Apple throwing it into a garbage heap in a second with the rest of the cheap knockoffs of the originall, I want to teach how to write games and how to program. I’m an educator at heart. Apple also last year made game programming a lot easier by introducing Sprite Kit to Xcode, the suite of programs used to write apps for iPhone and iPad. So a bigger challenge looms — can anyone write not just a clone but any game similar within a week’s time? If you have a Mac and can load Xcode, you are certainly welcome to follow along and write your own game. If you don’t, you may learn something too about a lot of what goes on behind the touchscreen of your iPhone.
The game itself is simple, which is what makes it such a great educational tool, and I’m not the only one doing this.

So Let’s see how to do this one part at a time.

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